Forever Under Construction

What do you want to know about Iran?

Posted in Iran by homeyra on April 20, 2008

See trailer

With the help of a Rising Voices microgrant, Shaghayegh Azimi will explain to Iranian filmmakers how they can use videoblogs to distribute their short films and documentaries to an international audience. Once the videos are available online, Azimi will also see to it that they are sub-titled and distributed widely via popular video-sharing networks.

Shaghayegh Azimi is an Iranian-American reporter and documentary filmmaker. Born in the United States, she grew up an equal amount of time in both the United States and Iran and says she spent a good deal of her formative years defending each of her two homes to the residents of the other. The major difference, she notes, is that while nearly all Iranians are informed about the latest cultural and political developments in the United States, many Americans can’t even locate Iran on a map.

If you wish you can share your comments and say what do you want to know about Iran.

See trailer and more about the project

Other videos at This Iranian American Life: Rosewater Wash and more

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8 Responses

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  1. Pedestrian said, on April 20, 2008 at 11:20 pm

    I am forever the pessimist! But even I thought this was a wonderful idea. Superb.

    If I were a non-Iranian that knew a bit about Iran, I think I would ask:

    Iran is more than just Tehran and Esfahan, right? … So what in the world is happening in the rest of it??!!

    I realize that many of our issues are national. But I also think many of them are not. The term “Iranian” can inhibit such an incredibly diverse set of people to a point where such a thing is impossible.

    I think these two cities somehow overshadow the entirety of the population. And I’m also afraid that the same will happen to this project.

    That’s the pessimist in me again! Because even if such a thing were to happen, it’s still a great idea!

  2. homeyra said, on April 20, 2008 at 11:45 pm

    🙂 We have been submerged in decades of cliché, our first reflex is also to wonder if this project will be the same story all over again, and will the participants be able to get over the usual stuff.

  3. Pedestrian said, on April 21, 2008 at 4:07 pm

    Sorry for all the unrelated comments … You serve as my encyclopedia 😉

    Homeyra, do you know anything about this (regarding the Ashura ceremonies):

    “The culture of mourning for heroes itself has a very long history in Persian culture, going back to the pre-Islamic mourning for the hero Siavash.”

    “Even before Islam, a ceremony much like Ashura was held in some parts of this land. Called “Kin-e Siavash”, it was held to honor the memory of a great but innocent prince mentioned in the Avesta, whose end was not the happiest of ones.”

    I have heard many times that the festivities of mourning date back before Islam. But I’m not sure how credible my memories are.

  4. homeyra said, on April 21, 2008 at 5:44 pm

    From what I know these processions were inspired by the Catholic ones as it exists in Spain and Portugal. Apparently Shariati has written about it.
    But you need a better encyclopedia 🙂

  5. […] reports that with the help of a Rising Voices microgrant, Shaghayegh Azimi will explain to Iranian […]

  6. Bluebear2 said, on April 24, 2008 at 9:49 pm

    many Americans can’t even locate Iran on a map.

    That is erroneous – should probably read “most”.

  7. homeyra said, on April 24, 2008 at 9:56 pm

    nearly all Iranians are informed about the latest cultural and political developments in the United States
    I would say that this is also an exaggeration, although in general people know more much more about the US than the other way around.

  8. Linda said, on April 25, 2008 at 1:14 am

    … according to a 2006 National Geographic study of Americans 18 to 24:

    *Three out of five cannot find Iraq on a map.
    *Almost 1/3 cannot find Louisiana on a map.
    *Nearly 1/2 cannot find Mississippi on a map.
    *20% think Sudan is in Asia, despite its being the largest country in Africa.
    *75% cannot locate Israel on a map of the Middle East.
    *Half cannot find the state of New York on a map.
    *Not only were 47% unable to find India on a map, 40% believe the majority of India’s population is Muslim.
    *Less than 30% believe it’s necessary to be able to locate countries in the news on a map.

    http://goodgirlroxie.blogspot.com/2008/04/stupid-is-as-stupid-does.html


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